Reviews

We welcome submissions for this section of JoPM. Reviews are critical brief summaries of scientific advances, the state of the science, or sub-topics within participatory medicine. If you are interested in submitting a review article, you may do so here.

 

Reviews, Vol. 6, 2014

The Challenges of Conceptualizing Patient Engagement in Health Care: A Lexicographic Literature Review

The term “patient engagement” is at risk of becoming a vague buzzterm, as it lacks a shared definition. This paper aims to pinpoint the key conceptualizations of “patient engagement” from recent academic literature, in order to deepen understanding of the term.

Read More
Reviews, Vol. 5, 2013

Mindfulness in Participatory Medicine: Context and Relevance

Mindfulness practice is gaining wide acceptance as an effective complement to medical care and therapy. At the heart of mindfulness is proactive personal engagement. We believe that it is time to begin considering mindfulness as an elemental principle in standards of care in the evolving model of Participatory Medicine.

Read More
Reviews, Vol. 4, 2012

What Is the Heart of Health Care? Advocating for and Defining the Clinical Relationship in Patient-Centered Care

The human connection between patient and clinician — the clinical relationship — is at the heart of patient-centered care. The authors aim to clarify the benefits of the patient-centered clinical relationship so that they can be more widely incorporated into practice, training, and accreditation.

Read More
Reviews, Vol. 3, 2011

Health Information Exchange: A Stepping Stone Toward Continuity of Care and Participatory Medicine

The author analyzes two successful health information exchange networks that represent promising models for integrating patient health information into one readily available source.

Read More
Reviews, Vol. 3, 2011

Spock, Feminists, and the Fight for Participatory Medicine: A History

If there is a moment when the modern-day relationship between physicians and patients changed forever, it was when Dr. Benjamin McLane Spock, author and pediatrician, rose to address the closing session of the American Medical Association’s centenary meeting on June 13, 1947.

Read More
Reviews, Vol. 2, 2010

The Role of Patient Organizations in Participatory Medicine: Can Virtual Health Communities Help Participatory Medicine Accomplish Its Objectives?

Patient organizations aim to improve the quality of life for people and their families who are affected by certain health conditions. Even though there has been a sharp rise in the demands on health systems during the last few decades, these systems have benefited from technological advances and the increasingly active role of users in managing their own health.

Read More
Reviews, Vol. 1, 2009

The Journal of Participatory Medicine: Setting Its Sights on a Community of Practice

The Journal of Participatory Medicine (JoPM) seeks to foster a community of cooperative health care. The opportunity is to create a forum for recognizing commonality while sharing differences. Another journal, the Annals of Family Medicine, also launched in the information age, provides some parallels for engaging diverse constituencies in an international transdisciplinary dialogue around scientific papers, essays, reviews and commentary. JoPM has great potential to be a gathering place for those interested in interactive approaches to improving health care and health.

Read More
Reviews, Vol. 1, 2009

The Field-Building Role of a Journal About Participatory Medicine and Health, and the Evidence Needed

A journal with “participatory medicine” in its name will challenge health care organizations, practitioners, care givers, and patients to examine their comportment and relationships. It will also challenge the scientists of medicine, health services, and patient education to re-examine their research methods and designs, because the participatory process will not lend itself easily to conventions of randomized controlled trials. The Journal will also be challenged by the shadow of impact factor scores with their bias toward academic rather than practical impact, and the need to report more fully on external validity. These challenges appear to be welcomed by the editors of this new journal.

Read More
Reviews, Vol. 1, 2009

Patient-Driven Research: Rich Opportunities and Real Risks

Since the Internet’s earliest days, patients have used online resources to share experiences, learn about diseases and treatments, and become advocates. A newer phenomenon has seen a growing number of online communities evolve into centers of patient-driven research (PDR)—especially for orphan diseases. Thanks to Health 2.0 capabilities, various models of PDR are being developed, usually involving methods of data collection and aggregation that can eclipse RCTs as meaningful evidence. A radical shift from the classical research model, this may result in accelerated findings and dissemination at a fraction of the cost of classic medical research.

Read More
Reviews, Vol. 1, 2009

Building a Research Agenda for Participatory Medicine

The emerging phenomenon of participatory medicine seems to lead to improved health outcomes, but this is not yet supported by a robust evidence base. Fundamental questions about the participation of individuals—sick and well—remain unanswered. Only through the convergence of many diverse and novel modes of research can the richness and complexity of participatory medicine be made workable…

Read More