Commentary

We welcome submissions for this section of JoPM. Commentary can be video, podcast or print essays and reviews of topics (e.g., innovation in peer review) and events (conferences, courses, lectures) relevant to the discussion of participatory medicine. If you are interested in submitting a commentary, you may do so here.

 

Commentary, Opinion, Vol. 8, 2016

Alternative Sources of Health Care On Every Corner and in Cyberspace

Faced with a shortage of primary care doctors, patients are finding alternative options — both in-person and online — for basic, sudden, non- emergency and routine medical needs.

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Commentary, Vol. 7, 2015

Lightning Goes to Ground

What really drives positive change in health care? A participatory physician argues that the key is the autonomy and empowerment of individual patients.

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Commentary, Vol. 7, 2015

Participatory Care in the Nursing Home Setting

Resident and family participation in nursing home care is becoming more the rule than the exception. The author’s challenge to nursing homes is to design formal ways to make it easier for patients and families to provide feedback.

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Commentary, Vol. 7, 2015

Digital Photography and the Medical Selfie

Patient generated health data – especially medical photography – can be very powerful aids in diagnosis and doctor-patient and communications.

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Commentary, Vol. 7, 2015

Patient and Family Access to Electronic Health Records: A Key Ingredient for a Pediatric Learning Health System

Giving patients access to their own EHRs could encourage them to better co-manage their disease as well as to contribute to ongoing clinical research.

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Commentary, Vol. 6, 2014

The Future of Primary Care: One Medical Student’s View

Both patients and physicians have grown too accustomed to the status quo of long waits and too little time to discuss the patient’s health or ask questions. The author envisions a future where primary care visits offer greater convenience and better outcomes for both practitioner and patient.

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Commentary, Vol. 6, 2014

Addressing the Problem of Medication Non-Participation

There is mounting evidence that patient non-participation in taking prescribed medications is associated with adverse outcomes and higher costs of care. The author analyzes the problem and offers practical solutions.

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Commentary, Vol. 5, 2013

A Model for the Future of Health Care

Today’s patients have access to more medical information on their smartphones than late-twentieth-century Surgeons General had available to them from all their health information resources. Major change is afoot in health care. What will that change look like?

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Commentary, Vol. 5, 2013

Shared Decision Making: Using Federal Health Policy as a Lever to Support Implementation

Many clinicians and patients may agree that shared decision making (SDM) will control health care costs and improve efficiency, but we need a clear and coordinated national strategy to support implementation of SDM if it is to deliver on its promises.

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Commentary, Vol. 5, 2013

It’s Time to Account for Medical Error in “Top Ten Causes of Death” Charts

Including fatal medical error in “top ten causes of death” charts and in public end-of-life discussions would be an act of participatory medicine on several counts: for medicine, ownership, transparency, and disclosure; which would offer citizens the opportunity to factor in medical error as we strive toward the goal of a peaceful death.

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Commentary, Vol. 5, 2013

Relationships Will Never Be Obsolete in Medicine

I have always believed that the relationship between the patient and their clinician is a vital part of care. But I wonder if I have misunderstood what is going on.

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Commentary, Vol. 4, 2012

Collaboration, Communication and Connection: Fostering Patient Engagement in Health Care

Engaging patients is a collaborative process that begins with good communication.

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Commentary, Vol. 4, 2012

The Impact of Open Access and Social Media on Scientific Research

Traditionally, research papers undergo peer review before publication. Two trends, open access and social media, are changing the peer review process.

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Commentary, Vol. 3, 2011

The Rewards of Being a Participatory Health Care Provider

The author gives the provider’s perspective on the story of a woman who became an engaged advocate for her two disabled sisters, and touches on some of the principle tenets of participatory medicine that guided their work together.

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Commentary, Vol. 3, 2011

Medication Adherence: More than Reminders

Focusing on reminders alone ignores the many other factors that contribute to nonadherence, improper use, and potentially harmful results. Better patient-provider communication is crucial to solving these problems.

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Commentary, Vol. 3, 2011

A Skydiver Jumps, and an Online Community Exults

A cancer patient shares a joyful story with her online support group and is surprised to learn how much it means to her fellow members.

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Commentary, Vol. 3, 2011

My 8-Point Participatory Philosophy: What Makes Me a Participatory Patient

The author reflects on the eight attributes that make up her personal definition of a participatory patient.

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Commentary, Vol. 3, 2011

Sharks, Bees, and Health Privacy Paranoia

The issue that the e-patient community should be focusing on, in regard to health information exchange, is accuracy. Inaccurate health data hurts people far more frequently and significantly than privacy violations.

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Commentary, Vol. 3, 2011

Who Gets to Define Quality?

After three years of looking at US health care, trying to figure out why it refuses to improve, I have a humble but impatient suggestion: When we talk about quality, we should only include measures that patients agree define quality.

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Commentary, Vol. 3, 2011

Health Care: A Human Rights and Economic Justice Issue

It ultimately falls to us, the patients, to frame health care as a human right and matter of economic justice, alongside national security, public education, and disaster relief.

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