Editorials

 

Editorials, Vol. 8, 2016

Considering the Evidence: Experience vs. Experiment

Modern medicine often disparages anecdotes as not worthy of serious consideration, but several studies suggest that we can all benefit from both types of evidence: experience and experiment.

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Editorials, Vol. 7, 2015

Improved Lifestyle is the Pathway to Health

it is ironic that patient-provider encounters spend so much time and effort on obtaining lab tests and adjusting medications and doses when attention isn’t being paid to addressing basic lifestyle issues. What accounts for this disconnect?

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Editorials, Vol. 7, 2015

Making Treatment Decisions in the Midst of Chaos

When the diagnosis is murky and the best treatment is unclear, patients must make treatment decisions amidst chaos and information overload. Co-Editor-in-Chief Joe Graedon shares his experience in navigating this tricky territory.

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Editorials, Vol. 7, 2015

Participatory Pediatrics

Taking care of children might seem like an area of medicine where paternalism should be welcomed and accepted. But even in pediatrics, building agency and participation can be particularly powerful.

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Editorials, Vol. 6, 2014

E-Patients Never Retire

Older patients have something to tell their health care providers: look at me; listen to me; and speak with me rather than to the person who may have come with me to the visit. Even enlightened health care providers may need to examine their implicit assumptions about older patients more closely.

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Editorials, Vol. 6, 2014

A Tribute to Jessie Gruman, Founding JoPM Co-Editor

Jessie had a uniquely constructive approach to Participatory Medicine that will be sorely missed and will not easily be replaced.

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Editorials, Vol. 6, 2014

“I No Longer Have to Go to See the Doctor:” How the Patient Portal is Changing Medical Practice

Since the introduction of a patient portal in our electronic medical record, my practice has changed substantially. My patients tell me it’s for the better.

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Editorials, Vol. 6, 2014

The Patient, the Provider, and Participatory Medicine—Are We a House Divided?

What does “participatory medicine” really mean? Widely varying interpretations have sometimes led to confusion and conflict, and threaten to limit our progress in advancing health.

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Editorials, Vol. 6, 2014

Fighting over Homework: an e-Patient Debate

Co-Editors-in-Chief Joe and Terry Graedon cite evidence that e-patients who research their conditions are in a much better position to weigh the benefits and risks of medication. But what about the many patients who don’t want to do their health care homework?

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Editorials, Vol. 5, 2013

Tom Ferguson’s Triangles in the 21st Century: An Initial Proposal

In 1995, Tom Ferguson, MD, predicted that the World Wide Web would turn health care on its head. Two decades later, his vision is holding up, and then some.

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Editorials, Vol. 5, 2013

Is the EMR Enhancing or Hindering Patient-Provider Interactions?

For better or worse, the exam-room encounter between a provider and a patient is drastically different now compared to “pre-EMR” days. Co-Editor-in-Chief Charlie Smith, MD tells how a participatory approach to using the EMR can enhance the benefits and overcome the challenges of the technology.

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Editorials, Vol. 5, 2013

Putting Patients on the Health Care Team

The airline industry offers us a magnificent model for how teamwork can save lives. With patients as “co-pilots,” clinicians and patients can work together to improve health care outcomes.

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Editorials, Vol. 5, 2013

How Do You Know if You’re Getting Good Medical Care?

Good medical care is difficult to describe because “good,” like “beauty,” is in the eye of the beholder — and, thus, is very subjective.

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Editorials, Vol. 5, 2013

Why Don’t e-Patients Take Their Pills?

Health professionals often feel frustrated or even angry when patients don’t take their medication. And patients may feel exasperated when prescribers seemingly ignore complaints about side effects. This communication gap leads either to confrontation and finger-wagging, or to patients keeping silent about what they are or are not doing. Neither approach belongs in a participatory medicine encounter. What’s the solution?

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Editorials

Participatory Diagnosis

Rather than denigrating patients’ partial or complete self-diagnosis, clinicians should encourage, inform, and incorporate the patients’ process as a tool for arriving at the truth. Participatory diagnosis is better diagnosis.

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Editorials, Vol. 5, 2013

The Real Problem with Misdiagnosis

If all we needed to reduce misdiagnosis was better software, we wouldn’t need physicians with years of education and training.

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Editorials, Vol. 5, 2013

Is Larry Weed Right?

Diagnostic software tools may be the answer to the perennial problem of misdiagnosis, according to a controversial physician-author. Co Editor in Chief Terry Graedon looks at the recent evidence.

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Editorials, Vol. 5, 2013

Patient Experience, Outcomes, and Participatory Medicine

The author argues that optimal health outcomes are impossible without patient participation, especially feedback.

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Editorials, Vol. 5, 2013

Harnessing the Power of Patient Experience for Understanding Side Effects

Once patients were able to connect with each other online, they realized that certain side effects were more common than they had imagined. Now the FDA has also come to the realization that the patient experience matters.

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Editorials, Vol. 4, 2012

Knocking Down Barriers to Care with Patient Centered Medical Homes

Everyone encounters barriers to care at one time or another, but they must be removed if we hope to create a cost-effective health care system that can engage patients and help them take responsibility for their own health.

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