Letters

We welcome submissions for this section of JoPM. Letters to the Editors should not exceed 150 words. If you are interested in submitting a letter to the editors, you may do so here.

 

Letters, Vol. 5, 2013

Why We Need Electronic Diagnostic Tools

The coauthor of Medicine in Denial argues that the best protection for patients against diagnostic failure is the use of electronic tools to enforce high standards of care for managing clinical information.

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Letters, Vol. 4, 2012

An e-Patient’s Frustration

Inspired by a recent JoPM article, the author shares his struggle to be heard by his physician.

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Letters, Vol. 4, 2012

Another Mental Health Professional Shares Her “Self-Care” Story

In this reply to a recent JoPM article, a psychologist shares her own insights and experiences about self-care, as a patient and a clinician.

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Letters, Vol. 3, 2011

One Step Forward, Two Steps Back: Why Can’t We Protect Doctors Who Put Patients First?

A reader expresses his frustration over a system that condemns doctors who try to humanize medicine through social media.

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Letters, Vol. 3, 2011

The Importance of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the Participatory Movement

To the Editor: Alternative methods are a significant and important support to healing and, I think, should definitely be included in JoPM’s agenda.

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Letters, Vol. 3, 2011

Letter: Developing a Positive Patient-Provider Relationship

I would like to elaborate on Mr. Scott’s points about development of a positive relationship between patients and health care providers. Just as health care providers are accused of possessing an edge of arrogance, patients sometimes possess the same; it’s a two-way street.

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Letters, Vol. 3, 2011

Response to “The Term ‘Patient’ May Describe Me…But It Does Not Define Me.”

A round of applause, please, for Michael Scott’s recent commentary. What struck me immediately was that this is something that is not confined to participatory medicine; society needs this seismic shift in relation to everything.

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Letters, Vol. 2, 2010

Response to “Evidence that Engagement Does Make a Difference”

Why do patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) opt out of surgery as a treatment option? Having been there with my wife, who survived NSCLC, (Stage 4; re-staged to Stage 2 after chemo), I can offer several reasons based upon real-life experience.

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