Vol. 6, 2014

 

Books & Literature, Media Watch, Vol. 6, 2014

Book Review: The Girl on the 6th Floor

Written by the father of an encephalitis survivor, this book shows participatory medicine at its best.

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Commentary, Vol. 6, 2014

The Future of Primary Care: One Medical Student’s View

Both patients and physicians have grown too accustomed to the status quo of long waits and too little time to discuss the patient’s health or ask questions. The author envisions a future where primary care visits offer greater convenience and better outcomes for both practitioner and patient.

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Commentary, Vol. 6, 2014

Addressing the Problem of Medication Non-Participation

There is mounting evidence that patient non-participation in taking prescribed medications is associated with adverse outcomes and higher costs of care. The author analyzes the problem and offers practical solutions.

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Editorials, Vol. 6, 2014

E-Patients Never Retire

Older patients have something to tell their health care providers: look at me; listen to me; and speak with me rather than to the person who may have come with me to the visit. Even enlightened health care providers may need to examine their implicit assumptions about older patients more closely.

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Editorials, Vol. 6, 2014

A Tribute to Jessie Gruman, Founding JoPM Co-Editor

Jessie had a uniquely constructive approach to Participatory Medicine that will be sorely missed and will not easily be replaced.

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Books & Literature, Vol. 6, 2014

Book Review: A Cure for Asthma? What Your Doctor Isn’t Telling You — And Why

This book challenges the conventional wisdom about the causes and treatments of asthma by describing the treatment protocol the author has used successfully on some of his patients – namely a course of antibiotics.

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Reviews, Vol. 6, 2014

The Challenges of Conceptualizing Patient Engagement in Health Care: A Lexicographic Literature Review

The term “patient engagement” is at risk of becoming a vague buzzterm, as it lacks a shared definition. This paper aims to pinpoint the key conceptualizations of “patient engagement” from recent academic literature, in order to deepen understanding of the term.

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Case Studies, Vol. 6, 2014

Lessons Learned from Implementing a Multi-Year, Multi-Project Public Engagement Initiative to Better Inform Governmental Public Health Policy Decisions

The author outlines lessons learned from a CDC initiative on public engagement and public policy decision making.

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Case Studies, Vol. 6, 2014

Case Abstracts of a Multi-Year, Multi-Project Public Engagement Initiative to Better Inform Governmental Public Health Policy Decisions

This paper examines a CDC initiative aimed at developing a feasible method of engaging the public that would better inform agency or sponsor decision making in the short term and build trust between the agency or sponsor and the public over the longer term. The initiative succeeded in the short term, but no ongoing infrastructure devoted to public engagement was created to achieve similar results over the longer term.

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Editorials, Vol. 6, 2014

“I No Longer Have to Go to See the Doctor:” How the Patient Portal is Changing Medical Practice

Since the introduction of a patient portal in our electronic medical record, my practice has changed substantially. My patients tell me it’s for the better.

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Research, Vol. 6, 2014

Evaluation of a Multistate Public Engagement Project on Pandemic Influenza

This study used a participatory model to evaluate six CDC-funded public-engagement initiatives pertaining to pandemic influenza. The authors describe the evaluation process and share lessons learned that may be useful in evaluating public engagement processes in general.

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Narratives, Vol. 6, 2014

But You Said I Wouldn’t Need Radiation

Which physician would you rather have as a patient? Here a breast cancer survivor analyzes the communication styles of two of her doctors — the first left her anxious and bereft, while the second helped her feel informed and hopeful.

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Editorials, Vol. 6, 2014

The Patient, the Provider, and Participatory Medicine—Are We a House Divided?

What does “participatory medicine” really mean? Widely varying interpretations have sometimes led to confusion and conflict, and threaten to limit our progress in advancing health.

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Research, Vol. 6, 2014

Do You Hear What I Hear? Communication Practices about Medications Between Physicians and Clients with Chronic Illness in Canada

This study identifies areas where physicians and adults living with chronic illness should improve communication to promote safe medication use: in briefing clients about their medication; the level of communication between physicians and clients, and the access clients have to physicians and the use of new technology for communication.

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Editorials, Vol. 6, 2014

Fighting over Homework: an e-Patient Debate

Co-Editors-in-Chief Joe and Terry Graedon cite evidence that e-patients who research their conditions are in a much better position to weigh the benefits and risks of medication. But what about the many patients who don’t want to do their health care homework?

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