Evidence

 

Research, Evidence, Vol. 9, 2017

Lessons Learned in Implementing Patient Family Advisory Councils in Ontario

Patient Family Advisory Councils (PFACs) have been emerging across Ontario to provide a platform for patient engagement in health care. This study looks at how effective PFACs work and how PFACs can improve quality of care as perceived by patients.

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Research, Evidence

Activating Racial and Ethnic Minorities to Engage in Preventive Health: Patient Preferences for Health Reminders

Health reminders can successfully encourage racial and ethnic minority patients to participate in their own health care. Texts, phone calls, or letters from health care providers may be particularly effective at improving patient health outcomes.

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Research, Evidence, Vol. 9, 2017

Finding the Patient Voice in Research Activities: Perspectives of Patient Advisors and Researchers

The authors’ findings highlight the challenges faced by patients and researchers in truly including a patient voice in research. Patients are eager to provide input but emphasize that they want genuine interest, not tokenism.

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Research, Evidence, Vol. 9, 2017

Rapid Streptococcal Antigen Detection Test Performed by Parents of Children with Sore Throat

It has long been our belief that patients and their families are the largest and least well-utilized resource for contributing to the provision of high quality health care, and that efforts should be made when possible to welcome and empower patients and their families, more as colleagues in the health care process than as passive-dependent recipients.

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Case Studies, Evidence, Vol. 9, 2017

Electronic Screening to Increase Identification of Risk: Lessons Learned in the Implementation of an mHealth Risk Assessment Strategy in an Urban Primary Care Environment

Urban, underserved populations experience significant disparities in the screening, prevention, and treatment of chronic disease. Electronic risk screening provides one method of eliminating disparities in the identification of risks, while limiting the burden on providers. This paper reviews the process, success, and challenges of implementing a tablet-based, electronic risk screening pilot study.

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Research, Evidence, Vol. 9, 2017

Use of Conjoint Analysis to Determine Patient Preferences for Surgical Treatment of Urethral Stricture Disease

Consideration of patient preference is especially important in making treatment choices concerning urethral stricture, which has no definitive treatment guidelines favoring endoscopic incision or open reconstruction. This is the first study to assess factors that patients value when choosing a treatment option for urethral stricture.

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Research, Evidence, Vol. 8, 2016

Exploring Self-Tracking as a Participatory Research Activity Among Women with Endometriosis

Women with endometriosis experience high rates of morbidity and a greatly reduced quality of life. This study confirms that women with endometriosis are willing to self-track as a participatory research activity, that the variables women want to track will be helpful to researchers, and that these variables are missing from current knowledge about endometriosis, but it is feasible to track them using patient participation.

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Research, Evidence, Vol. 8, 2016

Shared Decision Making at the General Internal Medicine Outpatient Clinic of the Philippine General Hospital: Patient’s Perspective

The authors developed and used a Filipino version of the 9-Item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM Q-9) to gauge patients’ impressions of how effectively their physicians practiced shared decision making in their clinical encounters at the Philippine General Hospital. Patients agreed that shared decision making was being used, but they identified areas where implementation could be strengthened.

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Research, Evidence, Vol. 8, 2016

Person-Centered Approach to Control Preferences in Psychiatric Outpatients

This study uses Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA) to gain insight into psychiatric patients’ control preferences of participation in decision making about their treatment. The authors conclude that MCA may help clinicians create individually tailored interventions to promote patient participation in decision making.

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Research, Evidence, Vol. 8, 2016

Ethnicity and Doctor-Patient Communication: An Exploratory Study of University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Nigeria

This study explores how factors such as language, a physician’s ethnicity, and patients’ gender can affect the nature of doctor-patient communication.

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Research, Evidence, Vol. 8, 2016

Adolescents’ Perspectives on Having Type I Diabetes, on Current Outpatient Diabetes Care, and on Improvement of Care by Using the Internet

The authors interviewed adolescents to determine how satisfied they were with their diabetes treatment. The adolescents were not satisfied with their access to physicians for non-emergency questions, but felt that an online treatment environment would improve communication.

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Research, Evidence, Vol. 8, 2016

The Value of a Therapeutic Gardening Intervention for Post-Stroke Patients’ Engagement During Rehabilitation: An Exploratory Qualitative Study

This study found that post-stroke patients who engage in therapeutic gardening perceive it as a way to foster their active role in medical care, enabling a proactive and positive attitude towards disease management. The authors encourage more research to grow the knowledge base regarding therapeutic gardening interventions.

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Research, Evidence, Vol. 8, 2016

Engaging Patients in Managing Chronic Disease: An Analysis of Data from the Connecticut Health Care Survey

This study highlights gaps in patient-provider discussions regarding modifiable behaviors that contribute to poor health and identifies opportunities for health care providers to be more proactive in engaging patients in pursuing their health goals.

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Research, Vol. 8, 2016

Community-Academic Partnership: Identifying Patient Perceptions Related to Obesity in a Spina Bifida Population

This paper presents a community-based collaborative care model designed to facilitate patient involvement and patient selection of meaningful lifestyle improvement outcomes for Latino youth with spina bifida.

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Research, Evidence, Vol. 8, 2016

Selecting Quality Indicators in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Care: A “Stakeholder-Driven” Approach

This study shows how a participatory approach provides a valid method of selecting relevant and important quality indicators for a specific setting.

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Research, Evidence, Vol. 8, 2016

Understanding Parent Perspectives Concerning Adolescents’ Online Access to Personal Health Information

Are parents comfortable with the idea of their teen children viewing their own personal health records? This study is one of the first to examine parental attitudes towards providing adolescents access to their own health information, and the first among parents of underserved youth.

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Research, Vol. 7, 2015

Participatory Group Prenatal Education Using Photonovels: Evaluation of a Lay Health Educator Model with Low-Income Latinas

A participatory prenatal education program can foster health literacy and empowerment among low-income Latinas, according to this study. The authors examined the effectiveness of a program in which trained lay educators facilitated groups using photonovels and experiential learning activities.

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Research, Vol. 7, 2015

What Do People Want from Their Health Care? A Qualitative Study

The doctor-patient relationship remains at the heart of people’s perceptions of health care, and innovations in patient-centered medicine should aim to strengthen this relationship.

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Research, Evidence, Vol. 7, 2015

Exploring an American Indian Participatory Medical Model

Racial and ethnic identity are critical considerations in health interventions. The relationship between ethnic identity and medical mistrust leads to poor adherence and poor outcomes, including low level of patient satisfaction. The authors’ findings indicate that respect for ethnic identity and culture may help to alleviate medical mistrust and increase patient satisfaction.

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Research, Evidence, Vol. 7, 2015

Text Messaging Improves Participation in Laboratory Testing in Adolescent Liver Transplant Patients

Self-care remains an important goal in the current health care and patient community, as demonstrated by this study.

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